The Girl Who Would be an Author

496 notes

historical-nonfiction:

Interesting facts about this populous and modernizing African nation
the country has over 250 ethnic groups, but three make up the majority: the Igbo (18%), Hausa-Fulani (29%), and Yoruba (21%)
"Nollywood" is the second-largest movie producer in the world, making 200 movies a week! (Bollywood is #1)
it is the most populous African nation and 7th in the world
the Portuguese reached Nigeria in 1472
but British imperialism that left the deeper mark — British conquest began in 1880 and reached the modern northern border in 1903
under the British, there was official segregation between “foreigners” and “Nigerians”
Yoruba and their bloodlines worldwide have the highest rate of twinning (having twins) in the world
the ”Aguda” is a specific population of repatriated Cuban and Brazilian slaves, which includes descendents of slaves who participated in the Brazilian “Great Revolt” of 1835

I dunno about you, but I think this is cool stuff to know!

historical-nonfiction:

Interesting facts about this populous and modernizing African nation

  • the country has over 250 ethnic groups, but three make up the majority: the Igbo (18%), Hausa-Fulani (29%), and Yoruba (21%)
  • "Nollywood" is the second-largest movie producer in the world, making 200 movies a week! (Bollywood is #1)
  • it is the most populous African nation and 7th in the world
  • the Portuguese reached Nigeria in 1472
  • but British imperialism that left the deeper mark — British conquest began in 1880 and reached the modern northern border in 1903
  • under the British, there was official segregation between “foreigners” and “Nigerians”
  • Yoruba and their bloodlines worldwide have the highest rate of twinning (having twins) in the world
  • the ”Aguda” is a specific population of repatriated Cuban and Brazilian slaves, which includes descendents of slaves who participated in the Brazilian “Great Revolt” of 1835

I dunno about you, but I think this is cool stuff to know!

2 notes

falloutstop asked: epiphany, goddess, iridescent

Iris is the goddess of the rainbow. It is her job to help send messages and gods and goddesses through the sky from Mount Olympus to earth and vice versa. When Hermes challenges her to a message delivering contest, she gleefully accepts, sure she can beat the speediest of the gods. But what if his goal isn’t just to beat her at a race? What if the god messenger has his sights set on the goddess messenger? And what if she only realizes it when he’s won her heart?

Filed under falloutstop

2 notes

inkwellsandpeacockquills asked: castle, poison, dolphin :P

Nina would have never thought, when she was a princess, that her father would drag her out of the castle in the dead of night and spirit her to the wettest corner of his kingdom and set her to work on building a new, ‘safer’ castle. And she wouldn’t have expected him to poison the men who brought the slabs of stone as soon as they had all been delivered.

But that is her life now: that of a slave, moving rocks half her size and getting callouses on her hands, feet, and knees. She works alone while her father goes crazy in the woods surrounding the area.

One day, however, just as she thinks she can’t bear this descent from her former life anymore, she topples off of a cliff and into the water. That’s when she meets the only creatures she feels she can love: a pod of dolphins. She comes to drop them some fish every day, and they are the only thing keeping her sane.

When a forest rogue appears on the scene, she thinks her rescue is at hand. But his intentions are to catch the dolphins for food— whose side will she stay on? Will she give up her chance at freedom to protect her friends? Is she as far gone as her father? And can she even trust this rogue?

Filed under inkwellsandpeacockquills

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a-l-earthworm asked: Ask meme, all of them

Let’s see, then.

01:When did you first start writing?

I started writing when I was about 14, though I’d been telling stories orally long before that.


02:What was your favorite book growing up?

I’d have to say Caddie Woodlawn. It’s an older book about a girl who was allowed to be raised like a boy for the sake of her health. I always felt sorry for her sister, Hetty, who didn’t get to hang out with her and the boys.


03:Are you an avid reader?

Yes. Right now, I’m working my way through a very thick book on the 1920’s and 1930’s; a fiction book I recently finished was The Other Boleyn Girl.


04:Have you ever thrown a book across the room?

No, but I did hit my sister in the face with a book once.


05:Did you take writing courses in school/college?

Yes. I took a Business Writing course, Writing for the Web course, and Creative Writing course, not counting the English Composition courses I took.


06:Have you read any writing-advice books?

One or two, most significantly the Book on Writing by Paula Larocque. 


07:Have you ever been part of a critique group?

Kind of. My writing group meets up two times a month, but we tend to shy away from the word ‘critique’.


08:What’s the best piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?

Hm… I’d have to say when one of the writers from my writers’ group said that elves that are basically plant people probably wouldn’t work without magic.


09:What’s the worst piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?

Gosh, that’s a hard one… I’d say it’s mostly when all the reader says is, ‘This is good.’


10:What’s your biggest writer pet-peeve?

When writers demonize Christianity/Catholicism,


11:What’s your favorite book cover?

The one for Cinder by Marissa Meyer.


12:Who is your favorite author?

Right now, Jackson Pearce. I adore her book, Sisters Red. You all should read it.


13:What’s your favorite writing quote?

It’s something along the lines of, “Every first draft is shit.”


14:What’s your favorite writing blog? c;

Fuck Yeah Character Development, though The Right Writing is very close.


15:What would you say has inspired you the most?

The troubles in my life, actually. I can’t go into them for the sake of my family’s privacy, but the harder things get, the more inspired I am.


16:How do you feel about movies based on books?

I like well-adapted ones, such the Hunger Games series, but a lot of them aren’t done right. However, I would be ecstatic if one of my books got made into a movie (and not just because of the money I would earn).


17:Would you like your books to be turned into TV shows, movies, video games, or none?

Ha ha, yeah. I think that would be cool.


18:How do you feel about love triangles?

I feel like they’re kind of silly, and not really a triangle. A triangle would be A > B > C >A. I actually have that in a novella/novel I’m working on (don’t know how long it’s going to be).


19:Do you prefer writing on a computer or longhand?

Definitely computer. I am a much faster typist than writing by hand.


20:What’s your favorite writing program?

I guess I just use Microsoft Word, but Celtx is pretty cool too.


21:Do you outline?

Only after I’ve written the first draft.


22:Do you start with characters or plot?

Typically, characters. I love developing new characters, though once I’ve got a first draft going, I’ll often pull characters out of a hat as I’m writing.


23:What’s your favorite & least favorite part of making characters?

I love being able to be creative, and make characters that aren’t just stock stereotypes. The part I don’t like as much is when I have to do tons of research (but I do it anyway, cause it’s worth it).


24:What’s your favorite & least favorite part of plotting?

I love when I’m brainstorming and getting tons of ideas; I hate when I realize there’s a plothole.


25:What advice would you give to young writers?

Just write, even if it’s like, Twilight or Transformers fanfiction. No writing ever goes to waste, and the more you do, the better you’ll get.


26:Which do you enjoy reading the most: physical, ebook, or both?

Physical, because I don’t have an e-reader. If I did, I think I would really like ebooks.


27:Which is your favorite genre to write?

Young Adult Fantasy, though I’m branching into New Adult Fantasy.


28:Which do you find hardest: the beginning, the middle, or the end?

The end. I suck at endings, but  I’m getting better.

29:Which do you find easiest: writing or editing?

Definitely writing.


30:Have you ever written fan-fiction?

That’s where I started out. My first piece of fiction was a Legion of Superheroes/Naruto crossover. Extremely short chapters and not so great prose.


31:Have you ever been published?

I’m getting a poem published by Eggplant Productions at this time. So, yes.


32:How do you feel about friends and close relatives reading your work?

I love it, most of the time. My one sister is a big fan of one of my books, and she’s very insistent that two characters have to get together in the end. My grandma also loved it. So, it’s a pretty good feeling to have people read it.


33:Are you interested in having your work published?

Yes, without a doubt.


34:Describe your writing space.

A desk in the middle of the busiest room in the house. :(


35:What’s your favorite time of day for writing?

Late night, because no one else is there.


36:Do you listen to music when you write?

Yes. My best writing music is the soundtrack from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. But oftentimes I do prefer dead silence.


37:What’s your oldest WIP?

Original fiction would be my book about an elf; oldest fanfiction would be the aforementioned one.


38:What’s your current WIP?

I have two: one about the elf, and another about werewolves. One’s more high fantasy, the other’s urban fantasy.


39:What’s the weirdest story idea you’ve ever had?

One where there are people with wings and people  who breathe fire, and they’re at odds because the winged people think they’re better.


40:Which is your favorite original character, and why?

Dagmar, without a doubt. She’s my absolute favorite, though I do also love her brother, Ingolf.


41:What do you do when characters don’t follow the outline?

Just go with it. That’s what editing is for.


42:Do you enjoy making your characters suffer?

A bit, yes. My poor, poor elf, is all I can say.


43:Have you ever killed a main character?

Not yet, but I plan to.


44:What’s the weirdest character concept you’ve ever come up with?

A character that is blind, but can see through the eyes of people around him.


45:What’s your favorite character name?

Annelise.


46:Describe your perfect writing space.

Cushy seat, closed off from everyone else, a desk with room for all my stuff, and snacks.


47:If you could steal one character from another author and make then yours, who would it be and why?

Probably Po from Graceling by Kristin Cashore. I can’t go into detail about why for the sake of spoilers, but I will say I love his personality and think he’d be an awesome character to have.


48:If you could write the next book of any series, which one would it be, and what would you make the book about?

Harry Potter, and it would be about the kids and their adventures.

49:If you could write a collaboration with another author, who would it be and what would you write about?

Probably Holly Black, since she has a lot of experience with the fae in books, and I’d love to write a story that has to do with them. Preferably one where a girl has to rescue a guy from the grip of the fae, while dealing with human bullies too.

50:If you could live in any fictional world, which would it be?

Narnia.

0 notes

ruffledjigglies asked: melody, flying and ribbon

Ella is a dancer who specializes in ballet; Soo Jin is an artist who specializes in street art. They have nothing in common— or so they think. When they’re both assigned to make a movie based on the concept of flying, they butt heads. They can’t decide on what means flying to them.

But one day, Soo Jin sees Ella dancing, and she knows what flying is. Will she be able to convince Ella to be the star of their movie? Will their differences be too stark to make a great movie together? Only time can tell.

0 notes

Game Time!

For the next hour or so, I would love it if people would submit three words to my askbox, and I will make a story summary for them.

:)

33 notes

100 Prompts for Stories

rachelina-and-dannysmith:

Setting Prompts

  1. Victorian times, in Ireland
  2. 1920’s Canada
  3. A small town in Ohio
  4. Somewhere in New York state that isn’t New York City
  5. A convent
  6. A Catholic girls’ school
  7. China during the Boxer Rebellion
  8. Ancient Rome, pre-Christianity
  9. Spain, during the expelling of the Moors
  10. In the middle…

A prompt list I made on my other account. Enjoy!

(Also, I do understand if they’re not the type of prompts you like. Different strokes for different folks and all that.)

Filed under Here's a prompt list I made on my other account.

2 notes

A Slightly Off-Topic Question

Has anyone seen Broken Trail? It’s a TV miniseries that I fell in love with when I was a young teenager, but now that I’m watching it, I’m seeing some of the problematic parts. I would just love to be able to discuss it with someone.

For background on what the miniseries is about: five Chinese girls are on their way to be prostitutes in the Wild West, since they have been sold by their families. Meanwhile, a white man and his nephew (plus a well-educated man they meet along the way) are driving horses from Oregon to Wyoming. 

Their paths end up crossing, and the men end up rescuing the girls when the man transporting them to their horrible fate tries to steal money from the men.

It’s got this awesome East meets West kind of thing going on, but I’ve realized that it has a rather ‘Mighty White Savior’ thing going on, among other things.

So, yeah, if anyone has seen it, or has suggestions for more East meets West media, I would love to hear from you.

Filed under Broken Trail movie TV series Wild West East

12,840 notes

dalishpeach:

Tender-hearted heroes are so important to me.

Heroes that are soft-spoken and kind, that want nothing more than to take care of everyone.

Heroes that are sweet and good, that always leave folks smiling in their wake.

Heroes that see good in everyone, who want to be good to everyone.

Heroes that are gentle and compassionate, that wish to share the boundless joy in their hearts with the world.

(via catboysam)

2,400 notes

When in doubt, the rule of threes is a rule that plays well with all of storytelling. When describing a thing? No more than three details. A character’s arc? Three beats. A story? Three acts. An act? Three sequences. A plot point culminating in a mystery of a twist? At least three mentions throughout the tale. This is an old rule, and a good one. It’s not universal — but it’s a good place to start. –
Chuck Wendig (via writingquotes)

(via characterandwritinghelp)